Publications
 
Student Outputs
 

Reframing Accessibility is the Key to Achieve Sustainable Urban Mobility in the
Global South: Freetown, Sierra Leone Case Study

September,2020


 

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This dissertation is written by Almos Tivadar Papp, MSc Building and Urban Design in Development Development Planning Unit (UCL), and supervised by Dr. Daniel Oviedo Hernandez.

 

This dissertation addresses the lack of accessibility and its role in achieving a transition to a more sustainable urban mobility in the Global South; the research for this study is based on the case study of Freetown, Sierra Leone. The work’s aim is to propose a framework for an advanced transition to a more sustainable urban mobility in which analysing the challenges to this transition identified locally is performed through the lens of accessibility. This framework is also intended to be applied to other cities in Sub-Saharan Africa, which face similar challenges.

Access the paper by clicking on the PDF icon below.

To What Extent Can E-Ticketing Foster Multimodal Integration Of Transport Systems? – A Maputo Case Study

September, 2021

 

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This dissertation is written by Julian Maximilian Kling, Intercollegiate MSc in Transport from Imperial College London and University College London, and supervised by Dr. Clemence Cavoli.

 

Based on the implementation of a new e-ticketing system on public buses in Maputo, Mozambique’s capital city, this research explores the extent to which electronic ticketing can foster the integration of multiple modes in a transport system. In particular, the characteristics of transport systems in the Global South and Sub-Saharan Africa are examined, to strengthen the understanding of the role that e-ticketing can play in integrating paratransit into Maputo’s public transport system. This study builds on a critical literature review and five semi-structured interviews with experts on multimodality, e-ticketing, and Maputo’s transport system. It discovers that e-ticketing can be a powerful tool to facilitate the integration of paratransit.

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Exploring the Relationship Between Gender Difference and Transport Poverty: A Maputo Case Study

September, 2021

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This dissertation is written by Mohamed Dahir, Intercollegiate MSc in Transport from Imperial College London and University College London, and supervised by Dr. Clemence Cavoli.

 

The main aim of the dissertation is to explore the relationship between transport poverty and gender difference and the associated inaccessibility issues. It focuses on Maputo as a case study of a growing urban economy in Sub– Saharan Africa. Focus group data provided by the T-SUM project is analysed using thematic content analysis. Key findings indicate that women’s mobility is locally bound with fewer trips outside of their neighborhood compared to men and women also have limited transport modes and tend to not travel at night due to fear of crime, demonstrating that women in Maputo are 'transport and socially disadvantaged' compared to men and therefore experience a higher degree of transport poverty.

Access the paper by clicking on the PDF icon below.

Analysis of Sierra Leone’s Medium-Term Development Plan (MTNDP): Challenges & Opportunities ahead of the tourism sector

Policy Brief - January, 2022

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This dissertation is written by Antoine B. Kallab, MSc Urban Economic Development,

 from the Development Planning Unit (UCL), supervised by Dr. Daniel Oviedo Hernandez.

 

This policy brief is extracted from a graduate dissertation submitted in October 2020 as part of the MSc. Urban Economic Development program at the University College London (UCL). It was conceived in the context of a fellowship agreement between the Development Planning Unit (DPU) - UCL and the Sierra Leone Urban Research Center (SLURC) in collaboration with the Sierra Leone Ministry of Planning and Economic Development (MOPED) and the National Tourism Board (NTB).

Access the policy brief (left) and the dissertation(right) by clicking on the PDF icon below.

Dense, diverse, and sustainable: exploring future pathways for the adoption of Transit-Oriented Development in Maputo

September, 2020

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This dissertation is written by Juan Omar Corona Barrera, MSc Building and Urban Design for Development, from the Development Planning Unit (UCL), supervised by Dr. Daniel Oviedo Hernandez.

 

This dissertation explores the planning framework of Transit-Oriented Development (TOD) within the context of the African city of Maputo, the capital of Mozambique. It attempts to identify future pathways to achieving sustainable urban development through transport equity. The research looks at ethical theories of justice and introduces the notion of just practices to evaluate the outcomes of TOD. To identify the trends that define current land-use policy and urban planning practices, the research follows the urban trajectory of Maputo, from the colonial period up until today. In conclusion, this dissertation also argues that even when there are presently several challenges preventing the possible adoption of TOD as a planning alternative for Greater Maputo, a context-specific version of TOD holds great potential as a strategy to promote sustainable urban development and stimulate the transition to equitable transport systems.

 

Access the policy brief (left) and the dissertation(right) by clicking on the PDF icon below.

STeAPP Project: Transitions to Sustainable Urban Mobility in Sub-Saharan Africa

August, 2019

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This research article was a part of the STeAPP project, cowritten by Enping Dong Nicole Kugelmass Holender Mario Reyes Saldias María Ricalde Cural and supervised by Dr. Ellie Cosgrave and Dr Joanna Chataway.

 

STeAPP’s involvement in the project was to support in the development and implementation of two focus areas: 1. Identifying some of the key factors that enable transitions to Sustainable Urban Mobility and build case studies of comparable cities that have exhibited good-practice approaches to SUM transitions. 2. Analysing best practices in participatory governance, processes and workshop design with the goal of providing a guideline that will be used as a manual for this project. The first part of the analysis was based on the theory of “socio-technical transitions” (Geels, 2007), which is used to explain the challenges and processes involved in pursuing a successful transition towards a sustainable urban mobility pathway. The second section of the analysis is focused on the factors enabling transitions to SUM. The third section consists of participatory governance and how participatory processes can enable transitions towards a Sustainable Socio-Technical Regime, by prioritising actions and practical steps to implement. The last section of the analysis integrates how for Maputo and Freetown to transition from their current Socio-Technical Regime to a SUM-based one.

 

Access the policy brief (left) and the dissertation(right) by clicking on the PDF icon below.